Seneca the Younger’s Apocolocyntosis: A Correction

The Apocolocyntosis (“pumpkinification”) is a first-century political satire of Emperor Claudius attributed to Seneca the Younger. SBLHS 8.3.14.3 incorrectly lists the work as Apolocyntosis, which results in the incorrect abbreviation Apol. The correct form of the work and abbreviation should be as follows: Apocol. Apocolocyntosis A translation of the work by W. H. D. Rouse … Continue reading Seneca the Younger’s Apocolocyntosis: A Correction

Citing Text Collections 9: Kitchen’s Ramesside Inscriptions

Work on a soon-to-be-published SBL Press volume (Trimm 2017) led the copyediting team to clarify references to the various parts of Kenneth Kitchen’s Ramesside Inscriptions volumes. This involved not only determining the abbreviation scheme to follow (since neither SBLHS nor Schwertner 2014 includes abbreviations) but also clarifying what is contained in each of the three … Continue reading Citing Text Collections 9: Kitchen’s Ramesside Inscriptions

Citing Text Collections 8: NTApoc

NTApoc is a two-volume translation of the sixth edition of Neutestamentliche Apokryphen, edited by Wilhelm Schneemelcher. The first edition of the German work was edited by Edgar Hennecke, which explains why sometimes one encounters references to Hennecke-Schneemelcher. The current edition of NTApoc is actually the second English edition; the first was published in the mid-1960s … Continue reading Citing Text Collections 8: NTApoc

Canon Muratori/The Muratorian Fragment

A blog reader recently submitted several questions about the Canon Muratori/the Muratorian Fragment, which provides an opportunity not only to consider this document but also to discuss the preferred way to cite Schneemelcher’s New Testament Apocrypha (NTApoc). This post will discuss the Canon Muratori/the Fragment Muratori; the next post will provide details on citing NTApoc. … Continue reading Canon Muratori/The Muratorian Fragment

Pseudepigraphic Testaments

A number of “testaments” survive from antiquity. These texts present themselves as the last words of important biblical figures such as Moses, Jacob, and Joseph. The SBLHS 2 §8.3.4 provides abbreviations for each work. This post will explain how to use these abbreviations when citing the testaments. 1. Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs Perhaps the … Continue reading Pseudepigraphic Testaments

Citing Text Collections 3: OTP

James Charlesworth’s two-volume Old Testament Pseudepigrapha is in some respects similar to Pritchard’s ANET (see here): both provide English translations to well-defined groups of texts from the ancient world. The main difference between the two is obvious: whereas ANET includes texts primarily from ancient Israel’s neighbors, OTP focuses on Jewish and Christian texts dated to … Continue reading Citing Text Collections 3: OTP