Citing Reference Works 10: Cambridge History of Judaism

As noted earlier (here), the Cambridge Ancient History (CAH) and Cambridge History of Judaism (CHJ) are somewhat similar to handbooks and companions but different enough to merit their own posts. This is especially the case with CHJ, since this post updates the SBLHS citation style for this series. Specifically, contra SBLHS §§8.4.1–2, which lists the … Continue reading Citing Reference Works 10: Cambridge History of Judaism

Citing Reference Works 9: Cambridge Ancient History

The previous post in this series offered guidelines for citing handbooks, companions, and other standard reference works that collect a number of individually authored essays on a clearly defined topic. The Cambridge Ancient History (CAH) and Cambridge History of Judaism (CHJ) both fit this description, but they also involve additional complications that merit separate discussion. … Continue reading Citing Reference Works 9: Cambridge Ancient History

Citing Reference Works 8: Handbooks, Companions, and the Like

Scholarly authors frequently reference a type of work that comprises a number of essays on a well-defined topic and that serves to introduce and/or summarize the state of the field of study at a given point in time. These works are often identified as handbooks or companions within the title, but not always. In some … Continue reading Citing Reference Works 8: Handbooks, Companions, and the Like

Citing a Chapter from a Single-Authored Work

The SBLHS 2 §6.2.12 provides guidelines for citing a chapter in a multivolume work (see also CMS §14.112): 15. Harold W. Attridge, “Jewish Historiography,” in Early Judaism in Its Modern Interpreters, ed. Robert A. Kraft and George W. E. Nickelsburg (Philadelphia: Fortress; Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1986), 311–43. Attridge, Harold A. “Jewish Historiography.” Pages 311–43 in … Continue reading Citing a Chapter from a Single-Authored Work

Semeia and Semeia Studies

In 1974, the Society of Biblical Literature launched Semeia, an experimental journal devoted to the exploration of new and emergent areas and methods of biblical studies. A year later, an associated book series debuted with the publication of Robert C. Tannehill’s The Sword of His Mouth: Forceful and Imaginative Language in Synoptic Sayings. The first … Continue reading Semeia and Semeia Studies