Citing Reference Works 9: Cambridge Ancient History

The previous post in this series offered guidelines for citing handbooks, companions, and other standard reference works that collect a number of individually authored essays on a clearly defined topic. The Cambridge Ancient History (CAH) and Cambridge History of Judaism (CHJ) both fit this description, but they also involve additional complications that merit separate discussion. This post focuses on CAH; the following one will turn to CHJ.

One sometimes encounters abbreviated citations of these works similar to the following:

15. Sidney Smith, CAH 3:61–70.

SBL Press discourages this approach not only because it omits the title of the chapter (we always include essay and article titles) but also because (1) it italicizes CAH, treating it as the title of the work, and (2) does not clearly identify which edition of the work is being cited. The latter two points require further explanation.

Although many regard Cambridge Ancient History as the title of a multivolume work, SBL Press considers it a series name and treats the individual volume titles as the primary identifiers.

Tempting though it may be to regard Cambridge Ancient History as the title and to use CAH volume:page as an abbreviated citation, the publication history of CAH does not lend itself easy to such a simple approach. That is, a few of the volumes in CAH are in a third edition, but most are only in a second edition, and several volumes are still first editions. Given this reality, one should always identify the volume being cited by title and edition; one cannot easily and accurately cite CAH merely by volume number.

The citation above, for example, is actually citing the first edition of volume 3, not the second edition of that volume (which appeared in three parts). Unfortunately, readers would not be able to discern that from the abbreviated citation. Likewise, if one simply cites CAH volume 1, readers will not be able to tell whether the first, second, or third edition is in view. Because of this complexity, SBL Press recommends the following citation style for CAH.

Principles

1. As with other collections of essays written by various individuals, the citation should identify the author and the title of the chapter (essay).

2. Each essay should be located within the individually titled volume in which it appears, not merely as a part of CAH.

3. As with other edited collections, the editors, edition, and series should be given after the title of the chapter, followed by the publisher information (city: publisher, year) for that specific volume.

4. The page(s) being cited appear last of all; the volume is not included here, since it is identified in conjunction with the series information.

5. CAH should be included in an abbreviations list as standing for: Cambridge Ancient History. Note that the series is set roman.

The examples below illustrate how these principles apply to chapters in different editions of several volumes frequently cited in our field. A short-title citation (for an additional article from the same volume) is offered after each full reference.

21. Sidney Smith, “Sennacherib and Esarhaddon,” in The Assyrian Empire, ed. J. B. Bury, S. A. Cook, and F. E. Adcock, CAH 3 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1925), 61–70.

29. D. G. Hogarth, “The Hittites of Assyria,” in Bury, Cook, and Adcock, Assyrian Empire, 138–41.

47. A. K. Grayson, “Assyria: Sennacherib and Esarhaddon (704–669 B.C.),” in The Assyrian and Babylonian Empires and Other States of the Near East, from the Eighth to the Sixth Centuries B.C., ed. John Boardman et al., 2nd ed., CAH 3.2 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), 103–5.

95. Joan Oates, “The Fall of Assyria (635–609 B.C.),” in Boardman et al., Assyrian and Babylonian Empires, 189–93.

———

16. Stephen H. Langdon, “Early Babylonia and Its Cities,” in Egypt and Babylonia to 1580 B.C., ed. J. B. Bury, S. A. Cook, and F. E. Adcock, CAH 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1923), 364–72.

22. S. A. Cook, “The Semites,” in Bury, Cook, and Adcock, Egypt and Babylonia to 1580 B.C., 186–89.

31. C. J. Gadd, “Babylonia c. 2100–1800 B.C.,” in Early History of the Middle East, ed. I. E. S. Edwards, C. J. Gadd, and N. G. L. Hammond, 3rd ed., CAH 1.2 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971), 617–20.

71. Roland de Vaux, “Palestine in the Early Bronze Age,” in Edwards, Gadd, and Hammond, Early History of the Middle East, 214–18.

———

65. Detlef Liebs, “Roman Law,” in Late Antiquity: Empire and Successors, A.D. 425–600, ed. Averil Cameron, Bryan Ward-Perkins, and Michael Whitby, CAH 14 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), 242–44.

68. Averil Cameron, “Justin I and Justinian,” in Cameron, Ward-Perkins, and Whitby, Late Antiquity, 79–82.

The Cambridge University Press website (here) lists the following volumes as the current editions.

Edwards, I. E. S., C. J. Gadd, and N. G. L. Hammond, eds. Prolegomena and Prehistory. 3rd ed. CAH 1.1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1970.

Edwards, I. E. S., C. J. Gadd, and N. G. L. Hammond, eds. Early History of the Middle East. 3rd ed. CAH 1.2. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971.

Edwards, I. E. S., C. J. Gadd, N. G. L. Hammond, and E. Sollberger, eds. The Middle East and the Aegean Region, c. 1800–1380 BC. 3rd ed. CAH 2.1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973.

Edwards, I. E. S., C. J. Gadd, N. G. L. Hammond, and E. Sollberger, eds. The Middle East and the Aegean Region, c. 1380–1000 BC. 3rd ed. CAH 2.2. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1975.

Boardman, John, I. E. S. Edwards, N. G. L. Hammond, and E. Sollberger, eds. The Prehistory of the Balkans, the Middle East and the Aegean World, Tenth to Eighth Centuries BC. 2nd ed. CAH 3.1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Boardman, John, I. E. S. Edwards, E. Sollberger, and N. G. L. Hammond, eds. The Assyrian and Babylonian Empires and Other States of the Near East, from the Eighth to the Sixth Centuries BC. 2nd ed. CAH 3.2. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

Boardman, John, and N. G. L. Hammond, eds. The Expansion of the Greek World, Eighth to Sixth Centuries BC. 2nd ed. CAH 3.3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Boardman, John, N. G. L. Hammond, D. M. Lewis, and M. Ostwald, eds. Persia, Greece and the Western Mediterranean, c. 525 to 479 BC. 2nd ed. CAH 4. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

Lewis, David M., John Boardman, J. K. Davies, and M. Ostwald, eds. The Fifth Century BC. 2nd ed. CAH 5. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Lewis, D. M., John Boardman, Simon Hornblower, and M. Ostwald, eds. The Fourth Century BC. 2nd ed. CAH 6. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Walbank, F. W., A. E. Astin, M. W. Frederiksen, and R. M. Ogilvie, eds. The Hellenistic World. 2nd ed. CAH 7.1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984.

Walbank, F. W., A. E. Astin, M. W. Frederiksen, and R. M. Ogilvie, eds. The Rise of Rome to 220 BC. 2nd ed. CAH 7.2. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.

Astin, A. E., F. W. Walbank, M. W. Frederiksen, and R. M. Ogilvie, eds. Rome and the Mediterranean to 133 BC. 2nd ed. CAH 8. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.

Crook, J. A., Andrew Lintott, and Elizabeth Rawson, eds. The Last Age of the Roman Republic, 146–43 BC. 2nd ed. CAH 9. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Bowman, Alan K., Edward Champlin, and Andrew Lintott, eds. The Augustan Empire, 43 BC–AD 69. 2nd ed. CAH 10. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Bowman, Alan K., Peter Garnsey, and Dominic Rathbone, eds. The High Empire, AD 70–192. 2nd ed. CAH 11. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Bowman, Alan, Averil Cameron, and Peter Garnsey, eds. The Crisis of Empire, AD 193–337. 2nd ed. CAH 12. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Cameron, Averil, and Peter Garnsey, eds. The Late Empire, AD 337–425. CAH 13. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Cameron, Averil, Bryan Ward-Perkins, and Michael Whitby, eds. Late Antiquity: Empire and Successors, AD 425–600. CAH 14. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

 

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