Idem

As CMS §14.30 notes, the word idem (“the same”) has sometimes been used to replace an author’s name when it occurs multiple times in a footnote.

8. Stephen D. Moore, The Bible in Theory: Critical and Postcritical Essays, RBS 57 (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2010); idem, Untold Tales from the Book of Revelation: Sex and Gender, Empire and Ecology, RBS 79 (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2014).

As noted in this post, however, SBL Press discourages the use of idem. Instead, repeat the author’s last name.

8. Stephen D. Moore, The Bible in Theory: Critical and Postcritical Essays, RBS 57 (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2010); Moore, Untold Tales from the Book of Revelation: Sex and Gender, Empire and Ecology, RBS 79 (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2014).

When the author of an essay is also an editor of the volume in which it appears, repeat the full name, not just the last name, in the “edited by” statement.

9. Alan H. Cadwallader, “One Grave, Two Women, One Man: Complicating Family Life at Colossae,” in Stones, Bones, and the Sacred: Essays on Material Culture and Ancient Religion in Honor of Dennis E. Smith, ed. Alan H. Cadwallader, ECL 21 (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2016), 159.

or

9. James R. Harrison, “Introduction: Excavating the Urban Life of Roman Corinth,” in The First Urban Churches 2: Roman Corinth, ed. James R. Harrison and L. L. Welborn, WGRWSup 8 (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2016), 44.

2 thoughts on “Idem

  1. How (if at all) is this rule regarding the repetition of the author’s last name (only) in place of “idem” impacted when the first reference in a particular footnote is to a work previously cited (which therefore requires only the author’s surname, a shortened title, and page number), while a subsequent reference in the same footnote is the initial citation of another work by the same author? To use the example of the two works by Stephen Moore you have listed above, would the footnote in this hypothetical case simply need to read roughly as follows:

    See Moore, Bible in Theory, 25; Moore, Untold Tales from the Book of Revelation: Sex and Gender, Empire and Ecology, RBS 79 (Atlanta: SBL Press, 2014), 57.

    Or, given the absence of the author’s first name and middle initial in the initial (short-form) reference, would the author’s name need to be given in full prior to the title of the second work?

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    • Good question! Our preferred style is to repeat the full name in the second reference. This follows the analogy of repeating the full name when one person is the author of an essay and the editor of the volume in which the essay is included.

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